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Seneca Place

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Latest News

Celebrating Thanksgiving

November 20, 2020

This Thanksgiving, staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others from COVID-19. Also consider these tips:


• Avoid crowds. Shop online sales the day after Thanksgiving and the days leading up to winter holidays.


• Use contactless delivery or curbside pick-up for purchased items.


• Shop in open-air markets and stay 6 feet away from others.


More tips:
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/holidays/thanksgiving.html

How to Properly Wear a Mask

November 13, 2020


COVID-19 spreads mainly from person to person through respiratory droplets. Respiratory droplets travel into the air when you cough, sneeze, talk, shout, or sing. These droplets can then land in the mouths or noses of people who are near you or they may breathe these droplets in.

Masks are a simple barrier to help prevent your respiratory droplets from reaching others. Studies show that masks reduce the spray of droplets when worn over the nose and mouth.

Your mask should:


✔️ Reach above the nose, below the chin, and completely cover the mouth and nostrils
✔️ Fit snugly against the sides of the face
✔️ Be made of multiple layers of fabric that you can still breathe through
✔️ Be able to be laundered and machine dried without damaging the material or shape


Do not buy surgical masks to use as a mask. Those are intended for healthcare workers and first responders.

If these tips don’t help or you have concerns about wearing a mask, talk with your doctor about how to protect yourself and others during the pandemic.

What Your Test Results Mean

November 6, 2020

Whether you test positive or negative for COVID-19, you should take preventive measures to protect yourself and others.

A viral test checks samples to find out if you are currently infected with COVID-19. The time it takes to process these tests can vary. You can visit your state or local health department’s website to look for the latest local information on testing.

• If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and want to get tested, call your healthcare provider first.
• If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and are not tested, it is important to stay home. Find out what to do if you are sick

Learn what actions to take when you receive either a negative or a positive COVID-19 test result.

Picking-Up Takeout Food: COVID-19

October 30, 2020

Picking up takeout food while slowing the spread of COVID-19?

  • Order & pay online or over the phone when possible.
  • Accept take-out without in-person contact or stay at least 6 feet away from others.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water or use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol after bringing home your food.

Learn more about taking essential trips at this time: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/essential-goods-services.html

What to Bring When Going Out

October 24, 2020

Going out? Keep these items on hand when in public spaces: a mask, disinfecting wipes, and a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol, if possible.

Learn more about everyday ways to slow the spread of #COVID19: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/going-out.html

What to Do If You Are Sick

October 17, 2020

Do you think you may have COVID-19? If you think you’re sick, follow guidance about when to call your doctor:


• Monitor your symptoms
• Call ahead before visiting your doctor
• Avoid close contact with others when you’re out


Most people who get COVID-19 can take care of themselves at home. If you need to see a doctor, take precautions to protect yourself and others around you.

See more: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/if-you-are-sick/steps-when-sick.html

Coping with Stress

October 9, 2020

Everyone reacts differently to stressful situations like COVID-19. You may feel anxiousness, anger, sadness, or overwhelmed. Find ways to reduce your stress to help yourself and the people you care about.


• Learn the common signs of stress.
• Make time to unwind and do activities you enjoy.
• Talk with family and friends by phone, text, or email.

If you or a loved one is feeling overwhelmed, get support 24/7 by calling 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746.

Learn more about stress and coping during the COVID-19 outbreak: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/managing-stress-anxiety.html

Information provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Hand Hygiene Recommendations

October 4, 2020

Hand hygiene is an important part of the U.S. response to the international emergence of COVID-19. Practicing hand hygiene, which includes the use of alcohol-based hand rub (ABHR) or handwashing, is a simple yet effective way to prevent the spread of pathogens and infections in healthcare settings. 

Hand Hygiene means cleaning your hands by using either handwashing (washing hands with soap and water), antiseptic hand wash, antiseptic hand rub (i.e. alcohol-based hand sanitizer including foam or gel), or surgical hand antisepsis

Cleaning your hands reduces:

  • The spread of potentially deadly germs to patients
  • The risk of healthcare provider colonization or infection caused by germs acquired from the patient

Methods for Hand Hygiene: Alcohol-Based Hand Sanitizer vs. Washing with Soap and Water

  • Alcohol-based hand sanitizers are the most effective products for reducing the number of germs on the hands of healthcare providers.
  • Alcohol-based hand sanitizers are the preferred method for cleaning your hands in most clinical situations.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water whenever they are visibly dirty, before eating, and after using the restroom.

Learn more at: https://www.cdc.gov/handhygiene/providers/index.html

Content provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Deciding to Go Out

September 25, 2020

Wondering how you can do your daily activities safely while protecting yourself and your loved ones from COVID-19?

The more closely you interact with others and the longer that interaction, the higher the risk of COVID-19 spread.

So, think about

  • How many people will be there?
  • Will the space be indoors or outdoors?
  • Will you spend a lot of time with others?

(“PST” here’s a hint – think People, Space, and Time.)Learn more about assessing the risk when you‘re deciding to go out: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/deciding-to-go-out.html

Healthcare Personnel and First Responders: How to Cope with Stress and Build Resilience During the COVID-19 Pandemic

September 11, 2020

Providing care to others during the COVID-19 pandemic can lead to stress, anxiety, fear, and other strong emotions. How you cope with these emotions can affect your well-being, the care you give to others while doing your job, and the well-being of the people you care about outside of work.

During this pandemic, it is critical that you recognize what stress looks like, take steps to build your resilience and cope with stress, and know where to go if you need help.

Tips to cope and enhance your resilience:

  • Communicate with your coworkers, supervisors, and employees about job stress.
  • Remind yourself that everyone is in an unusual situation with limited resources.
  • Identify and accept those things which you do not have control over.
  • Recognize that you are performing a crucial role in fighting this pandemic and that you are doing the best you can with the resources available.
  • Increase your sense of control by keeping a consistent daily routine when possible — ideally one that is similar to your schedule before the pandemic.
  • When away from work, get exercise when you can. Spend time outdoors either being physically activity or relaxing. Do things you enjoy during non-work hours.
  • Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting and mentally exhausting, especially since you work with people directly affected by the virus.
  • If you feel you may be misusing alcohol or other drugs (including prescriptions), ask for help.
  • Engage in mindfulness techniques such as breathing exercises and meditation.
  • If you are being treated for a mental health condition, continue with your treatment and talk to your provider if you experience new or worsening symptoms.

 Learn more at: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/mental-health-healthcare.html?CDC_AA_refVal=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cdc.gov%2Fcoronavirus%2F2019-ncov%2Fcommunity%2Fmental-health-healthcare.html

pollen

What’s the Difference Between COVID-19 and Seasonal Allergies?

September 4, 2020

When choosing to go out in public or visit a loved one at higher risk, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends we pay close attention to our symptoms. For those of us with seasonal allergies, understanding symptoms  can present a challenge!  

Seasonal allergies triggered by airborne pollen can lead to seasonal allergic rhinitis, which affects the nose and sinuses, and seasonal allergic conjunctivitis, which affects the eyes. Your sniffles and sneezes may seem like symptoms of COVID-19.

While COVID-19 and seasonal allergies share many symptoms, there are some key differences between the two. 

For example, COVID-19 can cause fever, which is not a common symptom of seasonal allergies. The image below compares symptoms caused by allergies and COVID-19.

seasonal allergies infographic

*Seasonal allergies do not usually cause shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, unless a person has a respiratory condition such as asthma that can be triggered by exposure to pollen.

This is not a complete list of all possible symptoms of COVID-19 or seasonal allergies. Symptoms vary from person to person and range from mild to severe. You can have symptoms of both COVID-19 and seasonal allergies at the same time.

If you think you have COVID-19, follow CDC’s guidance on ”What to do if you are sick.” If you have an emergency warning sign (including trouble breathing), seek emergency medical care immediately.

How to Safely Wear and Take Off a Mask | Covid-19

August 28, 2020

Covid-19 has been found to spread mainly from person to person via respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends wearing face masks to help slow the spread of COVID-19 when combined with every day preventive actions and social distancing in public settings.

Here are some guidelines on how to properly wear and take off a mask.

WEAR YOUR MASK CORRECTLY

  • Wash your hands before putting on your mask
  • Put it over your nose and mouth and secure it under your chin
  • Try to fit it snugly against the sides of your face
  • Make sure you can breathe easily
  • Do not place a mask on a child younger than 2


USE A MASK TO HELP PROTECT OTHERS

  • Wear a mask to help protect others in case you’re infected but don’t have symptoms
  • Keep the mask on your face the entire time you’re in public
  • Don’t put the mask around your neck or up on your forehead
  • Don’t touch the mask, and, if you do, clean your hands


FOLLOW EVERYDAY HEALTH HABITS

  • Stay at least 6 feet away from others
  • Avoid contact with people who are sick
  • Wash your hands often, with soap and water, for at least
  • 20 seconds each time
  • Use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available


TAKE OFF YOUR MASK CAREFULLY WHEN YOU’RE HOME

  • Untie the strings behind your head or stretch the ear loops
  • Handle only by the ear loops or ties
  • Fold outside corners together
  • Place mask in the washing machine
  • Wash your hands with soap and water

For more info, see: cdc.gov/coronavirus

Protecting Your Friends | Covid-19

August 20, 2020
As students start returning to school, it’s important to remember to follow these steps to protect your friends & yourself.

Traveling & Covid-19

August 14, 2020
If you are traveling, help stop the spread of COVID-19 and other respiratory illnesses by following these steps. 

Youth Sports & Covid-19

August 7, 2020
As we try moving toward a new normal, Summer sports are starting back up. Here are some tips and recommendations to keep you and your players safe during the Covid-19 Pandemic.

Food & Covid-19

July 24, 2020

Currently, there is no evidence to suggest that handling food or consuming food is associated with COVID-19.

Coronaviruses, like the one that causes COVID-19, are thought to spread mostly person-to-person through respiratory droplets when someone coughs, sneezes, or talks. It is possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object, including food or food packaging, that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes. However, this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

After shopping, handling food packages, or before preparing or eating food, it is important to always wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry. Remember, it is always important to follow good food safety practices to reduce the risk of illness from common foodborne pathogens.


Content Source: The Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Testing for Covid-19

July 17, 2020

Viral tests check samples from your respiratory system, such as a swab from the inside of your nose, to tell you if you currently have an infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Some tests are point-of-care tests, meaning results may be available at the testing site in less than an hour. Other tests must be sent to a laboratory to analyze, a process that takes 1–2 days once received by the lab.


How to get a Viral Test

Here is some information that may help you make decisions about getting a viral test:

• Most people have mild illness and can recover at home without medical care. Contact your healthcare provider if your symptoms are getting worse or if you have questions about your health.
• Decisions about testing are made by state and local health departments or healthcare providers.
• If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and are not tested, it is important to stay home.


What to do After a Viral Test
• If you test positive for COVID-19, know what protective steps to take if you are sick or caring for someone.
• If you test negative for COVID-19, you probably were not infected at the time your sample was collected. However, that does not mean you will not get sick. The test result only means that you did not have COVID-19 at the time of testing. You may test negative if the sample was collected early in your infection and test positive later during your illness. You could also be exposed to COVID-19 after the test and get infected then. This means you could still spread the virus. If you develop symptoms later, you may need another test to determine if you are infected with the virus that causes COVID-19.

COVID-19 testing differs by location. If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and want to get tested, call your healthcare provider first. You can also visit your state or local health department’s website to look for the latest local information on testing.

To Our Residents & Family Members:

July 16, 2020

On June 25th, Governor Beshear provided guidance to safely open visitation of nursing homes. As part of the reopening initiative, Seneca Place will begin to allow visitors on July 23rd; however, there are specific guidelines that must be followed. Our top priority is keeping our residents and care team members safe, and we feel the guidelines below will ensure their safety.
Visits must be pre-arranged or scheduled by calling the center. No visits will be allowed unless it has been pre-arranged. Visits will be limited per day and no longer than 30 minutes time per visit.
We will allow only 4 visitors at a time (1 per resident) and the visitors must wear masks and practice social distancing at all times which will not allow touching or hugging.
All visits will preferably take place outside of the facility weather permitting. Visitors are not allowed in care areas of the facility, including resident rooms. With that said, please keep in mind that visits may be canceled due to the weather or extreme temperatures.
If a resident is unable to visit outside, we will accommodate in the center visits, excluding resident rooms and care areas. We can also set up a time to connect to the resident by way of video chatting, face timing, if you contact the Activity Department.
All visitors will be screened at the time of the visit and will be asked to self-monitor and practice all recommended precautions before and after the visit. You will be required to utilize hand sanitizer prior to the visit, wear a mask and sign a visitor attestation form.
Please do not visit if you or anyone that you have been in contact with has been ill or has been diagnosed with COVID 19. Please also report if you or anyone that you have been in contact with becomes ill or is diagnosed with COVID 19 soon after a visit.
Visits can be declined or ceased at any time. This can occur if the guidelines are not followed by visitors or if there is an onset of symptoms or new COVID 19 cases within the center, either with residents or care team members.
Notification of any changes will be posted to our Facebook page and website. It will also be mailed to residents and/or responsible parties. You can also call the center at any time to see if there are any updates or changes to the visitation policy. We will also be updating our website at www.senecapl.com and will be adding an electronic calendar to also schedule visits as soon as possible.
Thank you for your time and patience.


Sincerely,
Taylor Shaw, LNHA
Executive Director

Visiting Friends and Family with Higher Risk for Severe Illness

July 10, 2020
When you visit friends & family who are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19, take these important steps. Wear cloth face coverings, stay at least 6 feet apart, meet outside if possible, wash your hands often, & sanitize all touched surfaces.

Cleaning and Disinfecting

June 26, 2020

When cleaning and disinfecting a public space, workplace, business, school or even your home, you have to put together a plan. Cleaning with soap and water removes germs, dirt, and impurities from surfaces while disinfecting actually kills the germs on surfaces. Cleaning lowers the risk of spreading infection, but disinfecting can even further lower that risk. Once you have a plan in place, you must implement then maintain and revise.

Develop Your Plan

  • Determine what needs to be cleaned
  • Determine how areas will be disinfected
  • Consider the resources and equipment needed

Consider the type of surface and how often the surface is touched. Prioritize disinfecting frequently touched surfaces and be mindful of the availability of products needed and PPE.

Implement the Plan

  • Clean visibly dirty surfaces with soap and water prior to disinfection
  • Use the appropriate cleaning or disinfecting product
  • Always follow the directions on the label

Maintain and Revise the Plan

  • Continue routine cleaning and disinfection
  • Maintain safe practices
  • Continue practices that reduce the potential for exposure

Continue to revise and improve upon your plan based on the appropriate disinfectant and PPE availability. Frequently wash your hands, use cloth face coverings and stay home while you are sick.


Content Source: The Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Fabric Face Coverings

June 12, 2020

Covid-19 has been found to spread mainly from person to person via respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks. Studies show that these droplets can usually travel around 6 feet and can land in the mouths or noses of people who are within that distance and possibly be inhaled into the lungs. Wearing a cloth face covering may not protect the wearer directly, but it may keep the wearer from spreading the virus to others. The Center for Disease Control recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain.

Examples of those settings include:
• Grocery stores
• Pharmacies
• Gas stations
• Post Office
• Bank


Cloth face coverings are encouraged because they will slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus (and don’t know it yet) from transmitting it to others.

How to wear your face covering correctly:
• Wash your hands before putting on your cloth face covering
• Wear it over your nose and mouth and secure it under your chin
• Try to fit the cover snuggly against the sides of your face
• Make sure you can breathe easily


Wearing face coverings is a way to protect those around you. It is encouraged to be worn so you do not transmit the virus to others if you have it and are not presenting symptoms yet; though there are things to keep in mind for your own safety in removing the covering properly.

Examples include:
• Don’t put the covering around your neck or up on your forehead
• Do not touch the face covering, and if you do, wash or sanitize your hands afterwards
• Keep the covering on your face the entire time you’re in public
• Handle only by the ear loops
• Fold outside corners in together
• After removing, do not touch your eyes, nose, or mouth, and wash your hands immediately after removing


Our care team members are required to wear medical grade masks at all times while in our communities. Cloth face coverings are encouraged outside of medical facilities and should only be worn in situations like the ones listed above.

Stress During Covid-19

May 30, 2020

Per the Center for Disease Control, the outbreak of Covid-19 may be stressful for people. Fear and anxiety about a disease can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions in those affected.


Stress during an infectious disease outbreak can include:
• Fear and worry about your own health and the health of your loved ones.
• Changes in sleep or eating patterns.
• Difficulty sleeping or concentrating


Here are some ways you can help cope with this stress:
• Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
• Take care of your body
• Take deep breaths
• Stretch
• Eat healthy, well-balanced meals
• Exercise regularly
• Get plenty of sleep
• Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
• Talk with people you trust about your concerns and how you are feeling.

Proper Handwashing Technique

May 22, 2020

Per the Center for Disease Control (CDC),Hand hygiene is an important part of the U.S. response to the international emergence of COVID-19. Practicing hand hygiene, which includes the use of alcohol-based hand rub (ABHR) or handwashing, is a simple yet effective way to prevent the spread of pathogens and infections in healthcare settings. CDC recommendations reflect this important role. Please refer to the handwashing diagram (below) provided by the World Health Organization to learn how to properly and most effectively wash your hands.

Our Response to COVID-19

November 28, 2020


To Our Residents and Family Members:

We know some of you may be concerned about the spread of COVID-19 (the new coronavirus) being reported in the media and how it may impact us here at the center.

Our top priority is keeping our residents and Care Team Members safe and we feel these measures are needed to ensure their safety. We understand that connecting with family members is incredibly important and there are a variety of other ways you might consider connecting with them. These may include telephone, email, text or through Skype or Facebook. Our Care Team Members are happy to help facilitate these alternative methods.

Our center is following the recommendations of the CDC on prevention steps, including following strict hand-washing procedures, and in many circumstances, wearing gowns and gloves when interacting with residents who are sick. We also are staying up-to-date with the CDC recommendations as they are updated. In addition, the center is in close contact with the local and state health department and are following their guidance.

We will notify you if any residents or Care Team Members are diagnosed with COVID-19. Should you have any questions, please feel free to contact the Executive Director.

Seneca Place Defense Program

Ensuring residents are cared for in a safe and healthy environment is our greatest responsibility. 𝗢𝘂𝗿 𝘁𝗲𝗮𝗺 𝗶𝘀 𝗽𝗿𝗼𝘂𝗱 𝘁𝗼 𝗹𝗲𝗮𝗱 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘄𝗮𝘆 𝗯𝘆 𝗱𝗲𝗹𝗶𝘃𝗲𝗿𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗮𝗻 𝗶𝗻𝗱𝘂𝘀𝘁𝗿𝘆-𝗱𝗲𝗳𝗶𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘀𝘁𝗮𝗻𝗱𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗼𝗳 𝗹𝗼𝗻𝗴-𝘁𝗲𝗿𝗺 𝗰𝗮𝗿𝗲 𝗰𝗹𝗲𝗮𝗻𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗲𝘀𝘀. As part of the “Seneca Place Defense” program, we follow a scientific approach using rigorous measures and our industry’s best products. We closely monitor recommendations from The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Our extensive efforts include:


Weekly COVID-19 Testing: All Care Team Members are tested at a minimum of every week.

Sign-In Kiosks and Temperature Monitoring: We utilize a digital system to screen guests and Care Team Members for symptoms of acute respiratory illness (e.g., fever, cough, difficulty breathing) before entering our community.


Personal Protective Equipment: Care Team Members and residents have access to masks (surgical, N95), gloves, gowns, face shields, and hand sanitizer. Care Team Members are required to wear a mask at all times.


Recycled Air Ionizer: Air Ionizers are installed directly into air ducts, producing positive and negative ions that neutralize harmful pollutants and odors in our buildings.

Plexiglass at Check-in and Nurses Stations: Plexiglass Shields at reception and nurses stations provide a physical barrier to reduce exposure and cross-contamination.


Electrostatic Sprayers: Sprayers provide a uniform and wraparound layer of germ-killing power, providing maximum efficiency disinfecting surfaces.

Deep-Clean Sanitization: Sanitizing lowers the number of germs on surfaces or objects to a safe level.

Daily Communications with Families: Our automated system keeps families and loved ones informed on COVID19 cases.