For more information and updates on COVID-19 virus Read More

To see a list of frequently asked questions please Click Here

Seneca Place

Latest News

Latest News

I’ve Already Had COVID-19. Do I Need the Vaccine?

September 17, 2021


You should get a COVID-19 vaccine, even if you have already had COVID-19. Research has not yet shown how long you are protected from getting COVID-19 again after you recover from COVID-19. COVID-19 vaccinations also help protect you even if you’ve already had the virus.


Evidence is emerging that people get better protection by being fully vaccinated compared with having COVID-19. One study showed that unvaccinated people who already had COVID-19 are more than two times as likely than fully vaccinated people to get COVID-19 again. Learn more about why getting vaccinated is a safer way to build protection than getting infected. If you were treated for COVID-19 with monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma, you should wait 90 days before getting a COVID-19 vaccine. Talk to your healthcare professional if you are unsure what treatments you received or if you have more questions about getting a COVID-19 vaccine.


Experts are still learning more about how long vaccines protect against COVID-19 in real-world conditions. CDC will keep the public informed as new evidence becomes available. To learn more, visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/prepare-for-vaccination.html

Find A COVID-19 Vaccine Near You:

July 22, 2021

Find a COVID-19 Vaccine: Search vaccines.gov, text your ZIP code to 438829, or call 1-800-232-0233 to find locations near you in the U.S. 

There are several ways you can look for vaccination providers near you in the United States. 

  • Visit Vaccines.gov to find vaccination providers near you. In some states, information may be limited while more U. S. vaccination providers and pharmacies are being added. Learn more about COVID-19 Vaccination Locations on Vaccines.gov
  • Text your ZIP code to 438829 or call 1-800-232-0233 to find vaccine locations near you in the United States. 
  • Check your local pharmacy’s website to see if vaccination appointments are available. Find out which pharmacies are participating in the Federal Retail Pharmacy Program
  • Contact your state health department to find additional vaccination locations in the area. 
  • Check your local news outlets. They may have information on how to get a vaccination appointment. 

Myths and Facts About Covid-19 Vaccines

July 15, 2021

Now that there are authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines in the United States, accurate vaccine information is critical and can help stop common myths and rumors. Read about some common myths here: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/facts.html  

How do I know which COVID-19 vaccine information are accurate?  

It can be difficult to know which sources of information you can trust. Before considering vaccine information on the Internet, check that the information comes from a credible source and is updated on a regular basis. Learn more about finding credible vaccine information.   

COVID-19 Viral Testing Tool

July 9, 2021

The COVID-19 Viral Testing Tool is an interactive web tool designed to help both healthcare providers and individuals understand COVID-19 testing options. This tool helps healthcare providers quickly access the most relevant, actionable information to determine what type(s) of COVID-19 testing they should recommend to patients. The tool helps individuals determine what type of test they should seek. After test results are in, the tool can help interpret test results and guide next steps.  

The online, mobile-friendly tool asks a series of questions, and provides recommended actions and resources based on the user’s responses. To use the Viral Testing Tool, click here: Testing | CDC

COVID-19 Travel Planner

July 2, 2021

The COVID-19 Travel Planner is a centralized communication platform that travelers can search to find COVID-19 information for the state, local, territorial, and tribal communities they’re passing through and for their destinations. This information will help travelers make informed decisions, protect themselves, and reduce transmission before, during and after they travel. Learn how you can promote Travel Planner on your social media platforms and website. 

Check Travel Planner for state, local, tribal, and territorial government restrictions before traveling. 

How Did COVID-19 Get It’s Name?

June 25, 2021

On February 11, 2020, the World Health Organization announced an official name for the disease: coronavirus disease 2019, abbreviated COVID-19. ‘CO’ stands for ‘corona,’ ‘VI’ for ‘virus,’ and ‘D’ for disease. The virus that causes COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, is a coronavirus. The word corona means crown and refers to the appearance that coronaviruses get from the spike proteins sticking out of them. 

How COVID-19 Spreads

June 18, 2021

COVID-19 spreads when an infected person breathes out droplets and very small particles that contain the virus. These droplets and particles can be breathed in by other people or land on their eyes, noses, or mouth. In some circumstances, they may contaminate surfaces they touch. People who are closer than 6 feet from the infected person are most likely to get infected. 

COVID-19 is spread in three main ways: 

  • Breathing in air when close to an infected person who is exhaling small droplets and particles that contain the virus. 
  • Having these small droplets and particles that contain virus land on the eyes, nose, or mouth, especially through splashes and sprays like a cough or sneeze. 
  • Touching eyes, nose, or mouth with hands that have the virus on them. 

Coronavirus Self-Checker

June 11, 2021

The Coronavirus Self-Checker is an interactive clinical assessment tool that will assist individuals ages 13 and older, and parents and caregivers of children ages 2 to 12 on deciding when to seek testing or medical care if they suspect they or someone they know has contracted COVID-19 or has come into close contact with someone who has COVID-19. 

The online, mobile-friendly tool asks a series of questions, and based on the user’s responses, provides recommended actions and resources. 

Fully Vaccinated? What You Should Keep Doing:

June 4, 2021

For now, if you’ve been fully vaccinated: 

  • You will still need to follow guidance at your workplace and local businesses. 
  • If you travel, you should still take steps to protect yourself and others
  • Masks are required on planes, buses, trains, and other forms of public transportation traveling into, within, or out of the United States and in U.S. transportation hubs such as airports and stations. Travelers are not required to wear a mask in outdoor areas of a conveyance (like on a ferry or the top deck of a bus). CDC recommends that travelers who are not fully vaccinated continue to wear a mask and maintain physical distance when traveling. 
  • Fully vaccinated international travelers arriving in the United States are still required to get tested 3 days before travel by air into the United States (or show documentation of recovery from COVID-19 in the past 3 months) and should still get tested 3-5 days after their trip. 
  • You should still watch out for symptoms of COVID-19, especially if you’ve been around someone who is sick. If you have symptoms of COVID-19, you should get tested and stay home and away from others. 
  • People who have a condition or are taking medications that weaken the immune system, should continue to take all precautions recommended for unvaccinated people until advised otherwise by their healthcare provider. 

I’ve Had COVID-19, Should I Be Vaccinated?

May 28, 2021

Yes, you should be vaccinated regardless of whether you already had COVID-19. That’s because experts do not yet know how long you are protected from getting sick again after recovering from COVID-19. Even if you have already recovered from COVID-19, it is possible—although rare—that you could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 again. Studies have shown that vaccination provides a strong boost in protection in people who have recovered from COVID-19. Learn more about why getting vaccinated is a safer way to build protection than getting infected. 

Experts are still learning more about how long vaccines protect against COVID-19. CDC will keep the public informed as new evidence becomes available.